We are the 99 percent. We are getting kicked out of our homes. We are forced to choose between groceries and rent. We are denied quality medical care. We are suffering from environmental pollution. We are working long hours for little pay and no rights, if we're working at all. We are getting nothing while the other 1 percent is getting everything. We are the 99 percent.

Brought to you by the people who occupy wall street. Why will YOU occupy?

OccupyWallSt.org Occupytogether.org somosel99por-ciento.tumblr.com wearethe99percentuk.tumblr.com westandwiththe99percent.tumblr.com

ATTENTION: Documentary filmmaker Bobbi Jo Hart is looking to connect with people who have submitted their stories to We Are the 99 Percent. She would like to bring your stories to life in a new feature documentary film. You can contact her directly at bobbigotgame@hotmail.com if you would like to know more and explore being interviewed on camera.

4th October 2011

Photo with 258 notes

When I was 17, I chose to attend an affordable state school in a village close to home even though I had been accepted to 2 “Ivy’s” and many of my friend were attending prestigious Universities around the country. My parents, who worked blue collar jobs, could not provide much support for my education so I chose state school knowing that I would have to pay the debt in full. I worked two jobs through college to make ends meet and networked constantly my junior and senior year to try to find work after school. The Monday after graduating with my “useless” communications degree, I started as an intern in IT at a local college, making minimum wage  doing work that was not related to major, but work nonetheless. After a year of showing up on time and doing my job, they hired me full time and I was awarded affordable health benefits and a retirement fund. Two years and no raises later, they offered to pay for my MBA through their program at the business school. In 2010, I bought my first car, a new toyota corolla with money that I’d saved for almost 5 years. In 2011, I bought my first house on my own after living on my own since college in a shared apartment — a $72K, 1 bedroom condo with mortgage payments that were affordable, even with my low income. Shortly after, I finished my MBA and I was promoted into a higher paying job that allowed me to make larger payments against my debt while continuing to live a modest life. I do not live with a great deal of luxury, but my life is the result of constant forethought and planning to secure comfortable means to live by. I do not not now, nor have I ever relied on anyone else to pay my way through life.

When I was 17, I chose to attend an affordable state school in a village close to home even though I had been accepted to 2 “Ivy’s” and many of my friend were attending prestigious Universities around the country. My parents, who worked blue collar jobs, could not provide much support for my education so I chose state school knowing that I would have to pay the debt in full. I worked two jobs through college to make ends meet and networked constantly my junior and senior year to try to find work after school. The Monday after graduating with my “useless” communications degree, I started as an intern in IT at a local college, making minimum wage ┬ádoing work that was not related to major, but work nonetheless. After a year of showing up on time and doing my job, they hired me full time and I was awarded affordable health benefits and a retirement fund. Two years and no raises later, they offered to pay for my MBA through their program at the business school. In 2010, I bought my first car, a new toyota corolla with money that I’d saved for almost 5 years. In 2011, I bought my first house on my own after living on my own since college in a shared apartment — a $72K, 1 bedroom condo with mortgage payments that were affordable, even with my low income. Shortly after, I finished my MBA and I was promoted into a higher paying job that allowed me to make larger payments against my debt while continuing to live a modest life. I do not live with a great deal of luxury, but my life is the result of constant forethought and planning to secure comfortable means to live by. I do not not now, nor have I ever relied on anyone else to pay my way through life.

  1. lincoln-mobile-marketing reblogged this from wearethe99percent
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  6. abigator-elf reblogged this from wearethe99percent and added:
    EXACTLY!! THIS IS HOW YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO LIVE!
  7. cluelesszombies reblogged this from wearethe99percent and added:
    Keep working hard. You’re one
  8. nightskieswithstarryeyes reblogged this from kelseycosmos
  9. madamescherzo reblogged this from wearethe99percent and added:
    Coke Nail: Advice...‘99 Percent’ Movement.
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  14. teacherdee reblogged this from caffeinatedfeminist and added:
    All of the above commentary PLUS fuck the notion that an Ivy League education is a luxury item. If you had any mental...
  15. my-racing-thoughts reblogged this from keepmyoceanscalm
  16. bright-and-erly reblogged this from queerartisticnotions
  17. keepmyoceanscalm reblogged this from queerartisticnotions and added:
    i believe in this so, so much. happiness > everything. this is so inspiring, dooood
  18. private-revolution reblogged this from caffeinatedfeminist and added:
    *Deep breaths* Okay OP, I appreciate the fact that you’re part of a small percentage of people in this country who are...
  19. Candie submitted this to wearethe99percent